News & Content: Member Blog

Attract Customers with Reputation Marketing

Monday, April 2, 2018   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Gary Hotze
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Megan Wenzl, Associate Editor, ReviewTrackers


When multi-channel sports retailer Concourse Sports acquired Team Express and its brands in May 2016, the team at Concourse knew it had to increase the star ratings of those stores on Google and Facebook.
 
The team at Concourse generated reviews to increase the stores’ average rating. They did this by asking customers for reviews with email campaigns.
 
Concourse Sports’ organic sales increased by 22 percent in August of 2017 because of several factors, including a positive online brand reputation, a revamped retargeting strategy, and a win-back campaign.
 
Online Review Generation
 
Online review generation is part of reputation marketing, which is when a brand builds a positive online brand reputation through the constant management of reviews and social media.
 
According to the 2018 ReviewTrackers OnlineReviews Survey, 94 percent of consumers say a negative review has convinced them to avoid a business. Brands should work to increase their positive across review sites to increase overall star ratings and give consumers more positive reviews to read when searching for a business.
 
Non-Review Sites Are Growing in Importance
 
Reviews on Google and Facebook should be a primary focus for brands.
 
According to the ReviewTrackers survey, more and more consumers are writing and reading reviews on Google. In fact, 63.6 percent of consumers report they will read online reviews on Google before walking into a business. Also, an analysis of 9 million shows that Google is the No. 1 site for the distribution of online reviews.
 
The analysis shows that consumers are leaving more and more reviews on non-review sites. Google and Facebook are both platforms for discovery – for finding out information about a variety of subjects including people, news, causes, and businesses.  So when a consumer is looking for information on how to fix a bike, for example, he or she might search Google for “bike repair.” The star ratings of local bike shops will show up in the search results whether or not the consumer was looking to go to visit a local bike shop. 
 
The consumer then might go to one of the local shops and buy some new gear (and ask an employee how to fix a bike).
 
Brands trigger emotional responses. Those emotional responses can be positive or a negative. It’s your job to make sure you are constantly on top of your reputation – making sure customers feel good about your brand on sites like Google and Facebook, where your next customer may be looking.

 

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